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in the middle east. elections are coming up. israel, jordan, egypt, iran, and elsewhere, we're seeing in front of our eyes more violent change happening in syria. the reverberations felt in every one of those country's borders. elsewhere from beirut to bahrain, it's a low boil, ready to burst out in a way that would affect our interests in very fundamental ways. there's two problems at the far end of the threat spectrum. the iran nuclear challenge on one hand and spread of al-qaeda and spread of terrorism on the other that will continue to dominate unless we forget within a year of taking office, both presidents obama and bush, his predecessor, were faced with previously unforeseen events that fundamentally challengedded their middle east policies. 9/11 for president bush, and the arab spring for president obama. there's a lot on the agenda. today, we're going to take an early look at what will be and what should be the foreign policy of a second obama administration in the middle east. now, we, at the washington institute, for us, this is just the beginning of a -- of quite a number of events
on in the world. israel and palestine is going up again. you have a lot of things happening. so does this make sense? >> if we had not been in iraq and afghanistan in the last 10 years, his art has a great presence in the pacific. as we look at the importance of the region, as we look at economic growth and we expect to see 50% of economic growth in the coming decade, as we look at the tremendous opportunities that we have, in the context of the china that is rising and economic power, it is clear that make sense rebalance to asia-pacific, even as we continue to engage globally. >> one of the things that is really interesting is that when america was shifting to asia, many of them here said you were going to neglect it. well, at that point, i don't think it was a fair comparison. because i didn't feel that american american resources were stretched to such a point that there is such a zero-sum game between one part of the world on the other. this is not being presented we had an idea about how women can have it all. the answer is no, that there are limits. >> we have continued deep engagements
you now, we see china, israel, others have drones now. every nymphet drums right now. it's going to be a very short time. before we do with the other side of that. we're already dealing with cyberattacks each and every day on our infrastructure, not the kind in the olympic games, but similar kinds. the answer to your question is it can reinforce existing power structures, but cannot also empower nonstate airs far faster than we get reinforced. >> i would say david's concluding point is a fair one except coming back to us. i think that we have kept ourselves still in this environment has been extremely competitive and you reference an area for the united states and that's energy. the united states is number one in natural gas. the united states has been working very aggressively in terms of ensuring that it is energy independent and towards this end, just the other day at "the wall street journal" highlighted the fact that the united states is now really grown exponentially in terms of its own oil production. i think were going to see more of that. precious to different powerbase
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3